Composites R&D

 

A composite material (also called a composition material or shortened to composite, which is the common name) is a material made from two or more constituent materials with significantly different physical or chemical properties that, when combined, produce a material with characteristics different from the individual components. The individual components remain separate and distinct within the finished structure. The new material may be preferred for many reasons: common examples include materials which are stronger, lighter, or less expensive when compared to traditional materials. Composite materials are generally used in aerospace, buildings, bridges, and structures such as boat hulls, impact resistant panels, racing car bodies, storage tanks etc. 

Fibre-reinforced plastic (FRP) is a composite material made of a polymer matrix reinforced with fibres. The fibres are usually glass (in fibreglass), carbon (in carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer), aramid and kevlar. The polymer is usually an epoxy, vinyl ester, polyester thermosetting plastic, though phenol formaldehyde resins are still in use. 

Bio composite (bio from Greek 'alive') is a composite material formed by a matrix (resin) and a reinforcement of natural fibres. These kind of materials often mimic the structure of the living materials involved in the process keeping the strengthening properties of the matrix that was used, but always providing bio-compatibility. The matrix phase is formed by polymers derived from renewable and non-renewable resources. In addition, natural fibres are the principal components of bio composites, which are derived from biological origins, for example fibres from crops (cotton, flax or hemp, banana, jute), recycled wood, waste paper, crop processing by-products or regenerated cellulose fibre (viscose/rayon). The interest in bio composites is rapidly growing in terms of industrial applications (automobiles, railway coach, aerospace, military applications, construction, and packaging) and fundamental research, due to its great benefits (renewable, cheap, recyclable, and biodegradable). Bio composites can be used alone, or as a complement to standard materials, such as carbon fibre. Advocates of bio composites state that use of these materials improve health and safety in their production, are lighter in weight, have a visual appeal similar to that of wood, and are environmentally superior.

Wind turbines are manufactured in a wide range of vertical and horizontal axis types. The smallest turbines are used for applications such as battery charging for auxiliary power for boats or caravans or to power traffic warning signs. Slightly larger turbines can be used for making contributions to a domestic power supply while selling unused power back to the utility supplier via the electrical grid. Arrays of large turbines, known as wind farms, are becoming an increasingly important source of intermittent renewable energy and are used by many countries as part of a strategy to reduce their reliance on fossil fuels. Wind was shown to have the "lowest relative greenhouse gas emissions, the least water consumption demands and... the most favourable social impacts" compared to photo-voltaic, hydro, geothermal, coal and gas. At MAFTREE, we have been developing our own vertical axis wind turbines - 2 bladed 180 degrees swept and 3 bladed 120 degrees swept composite bladed solutions under the brand of Cenkutt CVX50. We have also currently negotiating a collaborative agreement with High Peak Courses, UK to develop innovative technologies for efficient small wind turbines for agro-farms, sustainable rural centres and offshore. 

Energy storage is the capture of energy produced at one time for use at a later time.  A device that stores energy is sometimes called an accumulator or battery. Energy comes in multiple forms including radiation, chemical, gravitational potential, electrical potential, electricity, elevated temperature, latent heat and kinetic. Energy storage involves converting energy from forms that are difficult to store to more conveniently or economically storable forms. With modern trend of pollution free electric cars, MAFTREE is actively engaged in developing high pressure energy storage composite tanks for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles under research collaborations. MAFTREE has executed a number of collaborative research projects in this area and due to existing non-disclosure agreements, only key projects are highlighted here.

  • Optimisation of Fiber-Metal-Laminate for Impact Resistance
  • Tensile and Flexure Test Validation of Banana + Glass Fiber Reinforced Composites
  • Micro-capsule Integrated Carbon Fiber Composites - Crack Initiation Analysis
  • Tensile and Flexure Test Validation of Sisal Fibrous Composites
  • Carbon Nano Tube Dispersed Composites - Test Validation

MAFTREE is a research and development company providing bespoke scientific research and educational support services for the leading academic research centers and industries in India as well as overseas. Composites research and development is our core competence whether it is a simple gap analysis or solving a complex engineering problem. MAFTREE is a composites research and development company and has been in the business since 2009. Our core expertise of composite applications range from simple test coupon fabrication to detailed modelling & simulation to resolve complex manufacturing issues. Predominantly we focus on composite applications for a range of industries as well as social cause. MAFTREE has strategically chosen Japan, UK, France, Korea, and Scandinavia - Norway, Sweden, Denmark & Finland to facilitate international collaborations.

MAFTREE is a research and development company providing bespoke scientific research and educational support services for the leading academic research centers and industries in India as well as overseas. Composites research and development is our core competence whether it is a simple gap analysis or solving a complex engineering problem. MAFTREE is a composites research and development company and has been in the business since 2009. Our core expertise of composite applications range from simple test coupon fabrication to detailed modelling & simulation to resolve complex manufacturing issues. Predominantly we focus on composite applications for a range of industries as well as social cause. MAFTREE has strategically chosen Japan, UK, France, Korea, and Scandinavia - Norway, Sweden, Denmark & Finland to facilitate international collaborations.

 

A composite material (also called a composition material or shortened to composite, which is the common name) is a material made from two or more constituent materials with significantly different physical or chemical properties that, when combined, produce a material with characteristics different from the individual components. The individual components remain separate and distinct within the finished structure. The new material may be preferred for many reasons: common examples include materials which are stronger, lighter, or less expensive when compared to traditional materials. Composite materials are generally used in aerospace, buildings, bridges, and structures such as boat hulls, impact resistant panels, racing car bodies, storage tanks etc. 

Fibre-reinforced plastic (FRP) is a composite material made of a polymer matrix reinforced with fibres. The fibres are usually glass (in fibreglass), carbon (in carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer), aramid and kevlar. The polymer is usually an epoxy, vinyl ester, polyester thermosetting plastic, though phenol formaldehyde resins are still in use. 

Bio composite (bio from Greek 'alive') is a composite material formed by a matrix (resin) and a reinforcement of natural fibres. These kind of materials often mimic the structure of the living materials involved in the process keeping the strengthening properties of the matrix that was used, but always providing bio-compatibility. The matrix phase is formed by polymers derived from renewable and non-renewable resources. In addition, natural fibres are the principal components of bio composites, which are derived from biological origins, for example fibres from crops (cotton, flax or hemp, banana, jute), recycled wood, waste paper, crop processing by-products or regenerated cellulose fibre (viscose/rayon). The interest in bio composites is rapidly growing in terms of industrial applications (automobiles, railway coach, aerospace, military applications, construction, and packaging) and fundamental research, due to its great benefits (renewable, cheap, recyclable, and biodegradable). Bio composites can be used alone, or as a complement to standard materials, such as carbon fibre. Advocates of bio composites state that use of these materials improve health and safety in their production, are lighter in weight, have a visual appeal similar to that of wood, and are environmentally superior.

Wind turbines are manufactured in a wide range of vertical and horizontal axis types. The smallest turbines are used for applications such as battery charging for auxiliary power for boats or caravans or to power traffic warning signs. Slightly larger turbines can be used for making contributions to a domestic power supply while selling unused power back to the utility supplier via the electrical grid. Arrays of large turbines, known as wind farms, are becoming an increasingly important source of intermittent renewable energy and are used by many countries as part of a strategy to reduce their reliance on fossil fuels. Wind was shown to have the "lowest relative greenhouse gas emissions, the least water consumption demands and... the most favourable social impacts" compared to photo-voltaic, hydro, geothermal, coal and gas. At MAFTREE, we have been developing our own vertical axis wind turbines - 2 bladed 180 degrees swept and 3 bladed 120 degrees swept composite bladed solutions under the brand of Cenkutt CVX50. We have also currently negotiating a collaborative agreement with High Peak Courses, UK to develop innovative technologies for efficient small wind turbines for agro-farms, sustainable rural centres and offshore. 

Energy storage is the capture of energy produced at one time for use at a later time.  A device that stores energy is sometimes called an accumulator or battery. Energy comes in multiple forms including radiation, chemical, gravitational potential, electrical potential, electricity, elevated temperature, latent heat and kinetic. Energy storage involves converting energy from forms that are difficult to store to more conveniently or economically storable forms. With modern trend of pollution free electric cars, MAFTREE is actively engaged in developing high pressure energy storage composite tanks for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles under research collaborations. MAFTREE has executed a number of collaborative research projects in this area and due to existing non-disclosure agreements, only key projects are highlighted here.

  • Optimisation of Fiber-Metal-Laminate for Impact Resistance
  • Tensile and Flexure Test Validation of Banana + Glass Fiber Reinforced Composites
  • Micro-capsule Integrated Carbon Fiber Composites - Crack Initiation Analysis
  • Tensile and Flexure Test Validation of Sisal Fibrous Composites
  • Carbon Nano Tube Dispersed Composites - Test Validation